Japanese Whisky: Did You Know…


Our Stories October 11, 2011 1 Comment.

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• Japanese whisky is more similar to that of Scotch whisky than Irish whiskey, and thus the spelling typically follows the Scottish convention (omitting the letter “e”).

 

• The modern Japanese whisky industry can trace its beginnings back to one man, Masataka Taketsura. The son of a sake brewer, Taketsura went to Scotland in 1918 and spent two years studying chemistry at Glasgow University and working at a Scotch whisky distillery in the Highland village of Rothes. He returned to Japan in 1920 with a Scottish bride and a determination to change the Japanese distilling industry.

 

• Standard Japanese Whisky is a blend of malt whiskey (Japanese or Scotch) and domestically produced grain whiskey.

 

• The whisky distilleries of Japan are scattered throughout Honshu and Hokkaido, the two main northern islands of Japan, with the malt whisky distilleries being located for the most part in mountainous regions where there are good water supplies.

 

• Yamazaki Distillery is a Japanese whisky distillery located in Shimamoto, Osaka, owned by Suntory, Japan’s largest whisky company. It was opened in 1923 and was Japan’s first whisky distillery.

 

• Suntory was one of the first Asian companies to specifically employ American celebrities to market their product. One of the most notable is Sammy Davis, Jr., who appeared in a series of memorable Suntory commercials in the early 1970s.

 

• In recent years, a number of blind tastings have been organized by Whisky Magazine, which have included Japanese single malts in the lineup, along with malts from distilleries considered to be among the best in Scotland. On more than one occasion, the results have had Japanese single malts (particularly those of Yoichi and Yamazaki) scoring higher than their Scottish counterparts.

 

Via: tastings.com & en.wikipedia.org

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One thought on “Japanese Whisky: Did You Know…

  1. Pingback: Rising Star: Japanese Whisky | Drinking in America

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